Sunday, November 27, 2022

CDC Raises San Diego County to High-Risk Level for COVID-19

The continued increase in local coronavirus cases has prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to move San Diego County to its high-risk level for COVID-19.

The CDC tracks community levels of the virus based on geographic regions to determine the impact of COVID-19 in communities, and to allow individual jurisdictions to implement preventive strategies based on the latest local data.

San Diego had been in the medium-risk category since the end of May, but recent spikes in hospitalizations and new cases have led the CDC to increase the risk level for the region.

Actions You Can Take

The high-risk level means COVID-19 is widespread throughout the region and San Diegans should continue taking precautions to slow the spread of the virus. You should:

  • Wear a mask indoors when in public
  • Get all the vaccine doses and boosters
  • Stay home if you are sick and get tested
  • Avoid crowded places
  • Take other precautions, such as washing your hands and staying away from people who are visibly sick

The County continues to follow the California Department of Public Health’s SMARTER plan, which recommends vaccination, use of masks, testing and treatment among other things.

“San Diegans should take every precaution necessary to slow the spread of COVID-19,” said Cameron Kaiser, M.D., M.P.H., County deputy public health officer. “Most San Diegans have been vaccinated, but with this virus, and with the prevalence and infectivity of the new variants, a booster is highly recommended, especially for people who are immunocompromised or have other comorbidities.”

Got COVID? Get Treatment

If you do get COVID-19, County health officials say treatment is available. Treatment can help prevent high-risk individuals from getting sick enough to need hospital services and even from dying from COVID.

Oral medications, in the form of pills, and monoclonal antibodies, in the form of an intravenous infusion, are available at multiple locations and community pharmacies across San Diego. Antiviral medications require a doctor’s prescription and should be started within five days of developing symptoms of COVID-19. Monoclonal antibodies should be given no more than seven days after the onset of symptoms.

To determine which treatment is best for you, talk to your doctor or health care provider, or call 2-1-1 to find a provider.

More Information:

Data updates to the County’s coronavirus-sd.com website will be published Mondays and Thursdays around 5 p.m., with the exception of holidays.

Data through July 13, 2022. Updated July 14, 2022. Data are preliminary and subject to change.

 

 



Managing Editor
Managing Editor
Originally from upstate New York, Dani has lived in Coronado since 1996. She is happy to call Coronado home and to have raised her children here. In her free time she enjoys reading, exercising, trying new restaurants, and just walking her dog around the "island." Have news to share? Send tips or story ideas to: [email protected]
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